JAMA — Excerpt: Compassion Fatigue, July 17, 1991, Booth 266 (3): 362

JAMA — Excerpt: Compassion Fatigue, July 17, 1991, Booth 266 (3): 362.

Compassion Fatigue on our Campuses: Managing the Costs of Caring

Going to contact “Dr. Kate Kominars (Office of Employee Assistance) and Dr. Mary Wilkes (Director of the Faculty and Staff Assistance Program at Florida State University) presented at the International Association of Employee Assistance Professionals in Education “Compassion Fatigue on our Campuses: Managing the Costs of Caring”. (obtained here)

Concept Map for Theoretical Framework 09-16-09

Concept Map for Theoretical Framework 09-16-09

YouTube – Did You Know 4.0

What an amazing day it is for me!

One of the many things I do with my job is work with technology with Scott McLeod (supervisor/colleague/friend).
Last fall, Scott asked me to do some research for a new version of a big video (Did You Know 2.0) he and Karl Fisch did with the amazing talent of xplanevisualthinking.

Of course, I took the opportunity.

I am pretty excited, as this one was going to be premiered at a big conference with The Economist Media Convergence Conference in October (http://mediaconvergence.economist.com/) – and xplanevisualthinking also put it up on YouTube for people to start viewing – literally about 15 minutes ago – it has already had almost 500 people view it.

Did You Know 4.0 – released Monday, September 14, 2009
VIEW VIDEO

The original Did You Know 2.0 has almost 20 million hits/viewers
ORIGINAL VIDEO

Needless to say, I am very excited and nervous to have my name attached to something so amazing.
I am honored to have worked with Scott McLeod and Karl Fisch on this project.
Karl Fisch gives me kudos in his blog: http://thefischbowl.blogspot.com/
Scott McLeod in his blog: http://dangerouslyirrelevant.org/

Ch1 Overview: Dissertation (Hamrick & Marshall, 2009)

Theoretical & Conceptual Frameworks 9-10-09 – “Google Docs”

Generation WE: The Movement Begins… on Vimeo

Generation WE: The Movement Begins… on Vimeo on Vimeo

via Generation WE: The Movement Begins… on Vimeo.

The Hierarchy Of Digital Distractions | Information Is Beautiful

My friend, colleague, and supervisor sent this out to his staff:

The Hierarchy Of Digital Distractions | Information Is Beautiful.

In so many ways – I know this is true – on others – I believe that I am completely and utterly a better person for what I do with technology, and the connections I have made with so many versatile people.

Questions about the work

Questions about my work

  • How do I define social justice work?
  • Research questions – a lot of them -= how do you distinguish them – what are the sub questions – research question 1, 1a, b, c…
  • Focusing the big question
  • what do I mean by experiences? what does it mean?
  • what do i mean by mid-level?
  • Is this a part of their job? or do they advocate?
  • Field professes values around social justice – valuing, doing and implementing are not the same thing… how do mid-level interpret social justice
  • compassion fatigue…
  • x amount of experience in student affairs
  • seasoned == ??
  • People who have been in the field for 7-10 years+
  • Reshape for a smaller problem statement
  • Kim’s word: concomitant

PROBLEM

Updated: September 9, 2009 at 5:50pm

Student affairs professionals are positioned between students and the university’s power structure. Because of this hierarchy, the informal out-of-classroom interactions between students and student affairs professionals are often rich with diverse experiences. Higher education is built upon Eurocentric roots tied to the hierarchal system instituted within the colonial foundation of higher education (Altbach, 2001). The current system continues to privilege Euro-American white students, and has not yet adapted to the steadily diversifying student body. Due to these structures seasoned mid-level student affairs professionals are often stretched between policy, people, and purpose while working towards creating an equitable campus environment.

PURPOSE

Updated: September 9, 2009 at 5:50pm

The purpose of this qualitative study is to explore what seasoned mid-level student affairs professionals experience while doing social justice work in higher education through narrative inquiry.


Designing: Draft Stage Two

HGED 615H: Designing

Laura Bestler

Iowa State University

September 9, 2009

Research Questions

What I really want to know….

  • What is the impact of compassion fatigue on student affairs professionals working toward social justice on their campus?
  • Why do student affairs professionals work towards social justice? (Why do they do what they do?)
  • How do student affairs professionals feel while breaking down barriers for social justice? Do these feelings effect their work?
  • How do student affairs professionals strive for social justice on their campuses?
  • How do student affairs professionals face the barriers in higher education?
  • How do student affairs professionals feel when they have accomplished social justice on their campus?

Problem

Student affairs professionals are positioned between students and the university’s power structure. Because of this hierarchy, the informal out-of-classroom interactions between students and student affairs professionals are often rich with diverse experiences. Higher education is built upon Eurocentric roots tied to the hierarchal system instituted within the colonial foundation of higher education (Altbach, 2001). The current system continues to privilege Euro-American white students, and has not yet adapted to the steadily diversifying student body. Due to these structures student affairs professionals are often stretched between policy, people, and purpose while working towards creating an equitable campus environment.

Purpose

The purpose of this qualitative study is to explore what student affairs professionals experience while doing social justice work in higher education through narrative inquiry.

References

Altbach, P. G. (2001). The American academic in comparative perspective. In P. G. Altbach, P. J. Gumport, & D. B. Johnstone (Eds.), In defense of American higher education (pp. 11-37). Baltimore, MD: The John Hopkins University Press.